The Burning of the World: A Memoir of 1914 by Béla Zombory-Moldován

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The Burning of the World: A Memoir of 1914
Béla Zombory-Moldován

 Bela Zombory-Moldovan finds himself catapulted into the nucleus of war with very little time to spare. As the unexpected news is digested he has no time to reflect and soon enters the bloodbath where survival is every mans goal amidst battle where killing is the intent.

The question of ‘why’ rings throughout the narrative. Grasping at the ‘how’s’ both pre and post war hangs in the air as Moldovan’s life is forever changed, and he realizes he is not the man he once was. Battle scars on the outside heal but the remnants of scar tissue left mentally and emotionally last a lifetime. A close call with death causes Moldovan a pessimistic view as he finds himself feeling alone with no one to understand his loss of self, the forcing of letting go of who he was. Moldovan experiences a few poignant introspective moments regarding life and war which are telling and precise.

“Nature flowed on its course, impervious to the absurd behaviour of men, their mutual slaughter and assorted acts of wickedness.”

“I believe that the world would look on unconcerned of the whole of mankind wiped itself out. It would create others. They might be cleverer.”

A deeply affecting account of a man who survived the carnage of battle seeking humankind to express empathy and patience to a man who suffered physical, mental and emotional wounds spiraling him to the depths of loneliness and craving. Unable to fulfill the expectations of those closest to him, feeling as if he and those he loves failed, he finds solace in the accepting and unquestioning arms of curative nature. Bittersweet memoir of a gentle soul surviving being snared by the net of war.

Béla Zombory-Moldován

Béla Zombory-Moldován

Recommendation: 5/5

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